Program Schedule

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Keynote Speaker

Time:
09:30 - 10:15

Title: Impact of Nanobiotechnology on the Future of Medicine (Nanomedicine): The Road toward Precision Medicine

Shaker A. Mousa
Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, USA

Biography

Dr. Mousa finished PhD from Ohio State University, College of Medicine, Columbus, OH and Post-doctoral Fellowship, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY. He also received his MBA from Widener University, Chester, PA. Dr. Mousa is currently an endowed tenure Professor and Executive Vice President and Chairman of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute and Vice Provost for Research at ACPHS. Prior to his academic career, Dr. Mousa was a senior Scientist and fellow at The DuPont Pharmaceutical Company for 17 years where he contributed to the discovery and development of several FDA approved and globally marketed diagnostics and Therapeutics. He holds over 350 US and International Patents discovering novel anti-angiogenesis strategies, antithrombotics, anti-integrins, anti-cancer, and non-invasive diagnostic imaging approaches employing various Nanotechnology platforms. His has published more than 1,000 journal articles, book chapters, published patents, and books as editor and author. He is a member of several NIH study sections, and the editorial board of several high impact Journals. His research has focused on diagnostics and therapeutics of angiogenesis-related disorders, thrombosis, vascular and cardiovascular diseases.

Abstract

Over the past few years, evidence from the scientific and medical communities has demonstrated that nanotechnology and nanomedicine have tremendous potential to profoundly impact numerous aspects of cancer and other disorders in term of early diagnosis and targeted therapy. The utilization of nanotechnology for the development of new nano-carrier systems has the potential to offer improved chemotherapeutic delivery through increased solubility and sustained retention. One of the major advantages of this cutting edge technology is its unique multifunctional characteristics. Targeted delivery of drug incorporated nanoparticles, through conjugation of tumor-specific cell surface markers, such as tumor-specific antibodies or ligands, which can enhance the efficacy of the anticancer drug and reduce the side effects. Additionally, multifunctional characteristics of the nano-carrier system would allow for simultaneous imaging of tumor mass, targeted drug delivery and monitoring (Theranostics). A summary of recent progress in nanotechnology as it relates specifically to nanoparticles and anticancer drug delivery will be reviewed. Nano Nutraceuticals using combination of various natural products provide a great potential in diseases prevention. Additionally, various Nanomedicine approaches for the detection and treatment of various types of organ specific delivery, vascular targeting, and vaccine will be briefly discussed.

Keynote Speaker

Time:
10:15 - 11:00

Title: Functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes for gas sensing

Adnane Abdelghani
American University in Cairo, Egypt

Biography

rof. Dr. A.Abdelghani is a Full Professor at the National Institute of Applied Science and Technology (INSAT, Tunisia).He obtained the Habilitation in Physics in Tunisia (faculty of Science of Tunis) in 2004 and a Habilitation (worlwide recognition for conducting and leading research) in "Sciences pour l�Ing�nieur" in 2009 at the Ecole Normale Superieur de Cachan (France). He is now the leader and principal investigator of a research group working mainly on gas sensors based on functionalized carbon nanotubes (metallic oxides, nanowires, nanoneedles, polymers) and on the development of interdigitated gold microelectrodes integrated in microfluidic cell for bacteria analysis in biologic medium. He published more than 90 papers in International Journals (H-index 25, December 2016) and supervised more than 12 Ph.D theses and 30 master�s student. He is deeply involved in industrial applications in his field of research with implications for the design and the development of affordable and cost-effective sensing devices for diagnostics and theranostics which will have an effective impact in the developing countries. He received the Tunisian President Award of the best scientific researcher in Tunisia in 22 July 2015.

Abstract

The monitoring of the environment requires devices that must be fast, sensitive, stable and selective to detect the pollutants and toxic gases/ vapors in a simple and efficient way. The chemical modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a long chain mercapto-acid is reported to improve the sensitivity and the response time of gas sensors for detecting alcohols, acetone and toxic gases such as DMMP and DMF. We developed sensors employing MWCNTs decorated with gold nanoparticles and modified with 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) monolayer. Morphological and compositional analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to characterize the gold nanoparticles and to check the bonding of the thiol monolayer. The detection of aromatic and non-aromatic volatiles and DMMP and DMF vapors by MWCNT/Au and MWCNT/Au/MHDA shows that the presence of the self-assembled layer increases sensitivity, selectivity and ameliorates response dynamics of the sensors.

Sessions:
Recent developments in Nanotechnology and Nanoscience, Nanotechnology and Applications

Time:

Session Chair:

Guenter Zschornack
Dreebit GmbH, Germany

Time:

Session Co-Chair:

Hideo MIURA
Tohoku University, Japan

Time:
11:15 - 11:40

Title: Highly charged ions for nanotechnology applications and materials analysis

Guenter Zschornack
Dreebit GmbH, Germany

Biography

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Guenter Zschornack has teached for more than 40 years at the Dresden University of Technology in the fields of atomic physics, ion beam physics as well as ion source physics. He is author and coauthor of more than 300 scientific papers, of about 400 conference contributions and of 3 books. Beside a lot of international cooperation he also worked at the Division of New Acceleration Methods of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Dubna /Russiafor 8 years. Together with Dr. F.Grossmann he founded the Dreebit GmbH in 2006, a plasma, electron and ion beam technology company active in high-technology areas such as nanostructuring with highly charged ions and in the field of medical particle therapy.

Abstract

Beams of Highly Charged Ions (HCI) are of principal interest for applications in surface structuring in nanometer dimensions and materials analysis. The most distinctive feature of these ions is their high amount of stored potential energy due to the ionization process. As a result, in interactions with solid state surfaces, a high amount of energy is deposited onto a small nanometer-scaled reaction zone leading to a power deposition onto the surface in the order of 1012to 1014 W/cm2. This process is accompanied by exceptional high secondary ion and electron yields, a property complementing and improving different material analysis techniques (TOF-SIMS etc.). Furthermore, the spectrum of different charge states provides a broad usable kinetic energy range for adjusting ion range as well as sputter yield. The intense ion-surface interaction allows creating surface nanostructures by single ion hits altering the structure dimensions in dependence on the ion charge and energy from a few to some tens of nm modifying the morphology, electrical and optical properties. In the first part of the talk we will introduce a sophisticated MicroFIB table-top platform based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), capable of producing focused beams of HCI. Such probes having sub-micrometer diameters allows exploring the potential of single ion implantation technologies. In comparison to classical FIB there arise new possibilities due to: • all elements can be used for source operation, • free choice of the charge state (low charged up to highly charged ions), • selection of the kinetic and potential energy of the projectiles by the ion charge state, • variable sputter yield by variable kinetic and potential energy can be applied, • variable ion range by variable kinetic energy for implantation processes, • variable feature size by variable potential energy. The listed advantages are an outstanding basis for applications in quantum technologies (quantum dots, quantum cryptography), lithography, nanoengineering, microphotonics, biomedicine etc. and are demonstrated with selected examples. HCI in combination with special analytic tools such as TOF-SIMS or compact AMS open the door to extremely sensitive surface analysis as well as for a very sensitive analysis of liquid probes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated with examples of measurements of metal content in liquids in the pbb-range, the analysis of isotope composition of copper clusters as well as the indication of the increasing efficiency of the secondary ions production by ions with increasing ion charge state. Possible future applications will be discussed.

Time:
11:40 - 12:05

Title: Atomic-scale structural control of graphene nano-ribbon for smart sensor applications

Hideo MIURA
Tohoku University, Japan

Biography

Hideo Miura received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering, the M.S. degree in Electronic Engineering, and PhD. in Mechanical Engineering from Tohoku University, Japan in 1981, 1983 and 1992, respectively. He joined Mechanical Engineering Research Laboratory, Hitachi ltd., Ibaraki, Japan in 1983. Since then, he had been engaged in research and development of technologies for mechanical reliability design of semiconductor devices such as 256 kb-256 Mb DRAM and 1 Mb-16 Mb SRAM, their packages, and testing methods for them. In February 2003, he moved to Tohoku University as a Professor of Graduate School of Engineering. He is now a Director and Professor of Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University. His main research topic now is prediction and prevention of fracture of advanced functional materials and devices.

Abstract

Graphene have great potential for ultra-sensitive strain sensors applications due to its high mechanical strength and good compatibility with the traditional semiconductor processes. In the current study, we investigated the effect of tensile and bending deformations on the electronic states of graphene nano-ribbons (GNRs) using density functional theory (DFT) to clarify the underlying mechanism of the piezoresistive properties of graphene. It was found that the electronic properties of GNRs change from metallic to semiconductive when the width of the GNRs is thinner than 70 nm at room temperature, and the electronic structure of armchair graphene nano-ribbons (AGNRs) is very sensitive to the tensile deformation. When uniaxial tensile strain is applied to AGNRs with different width, theirelectronic band structureschange drastically depending on the width of the AGNRs and the amplitude of the applied strain, leading to the change in band gap approximately from 0 eV to 1.0 eV. The band gap values of bended AGNRs decrease significantly when the maximum local dihedral angle between the nearby -orbits exceeds a critical value due to the orbital hybridization between -orbit and -orbit. In order to assure the unique strain-dependent characteristics of GNRs, it is very important to control the number of carbon atoms along the width direction of AGNRs. Based on these analyses, we fabricated a strain sensor using the graphene film grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method on Cu foil using acetylene gas. The strain sensor is fabricated directly on the graphene-coated Cu foils by using the standard photolithography process and reactive ion etching (RIE) and then, transferred onto a stretchable and flexible polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) substrate. The measured mobility of holes was 1130 cm2/(V•s). This result clearly indicates that the high-quality graphene was successfully deposited on the SiO2/Si substrate suing acetylene-based CVD process and the proposed process was easily adaptable with the conventional fabrication processes for thin-film devices.The one-dimensional tensile test and three-dimensional bending test are performed to investigate the piezoresistive properties. The fabricated strain sensor also exhibits good performance to detect bending deformation. The obtained maximum gauge factor of the GNR-base strain sensor was much larger than that of conventional semiconductor strain gauges.Finally, it was concluded that stable and low-cost fabrication process of the graphene-base transistor and strain gauge has been successfully developed by using the CVD process using acetylene gas.

Time:
12:05 - 12:30

Title: Low power gas sensors using organic-inorganic nanocomposite for petroleum refineries

Saleh Thaker Mahmoud
UAE University, United Arab Emirates

Biography

Prof. Saleh obtained his Ph.D. in Physics from Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi (India 2001). He is a full professor at UAE University and has 16 years experience in materials characterization, nanodevices fabrication and laser-plasma interactions, His publication record includes about 50 publications in international peer-reviewed journals and more than 25 presentations in international conferences. He is the principle investigator and Co-PI of 14 research projects and supervised several postgraduate students. He is an expert in measuring the optical and electrical properties of nanomaterials using different techniques. He has vast experience in nanoparticles synthesis and sensors fabrication for detecting hazardous gasses.

Abstract

Lower power consumption and higher performance are compelling demands in the electronic systems motivating the search for new materials which are capable of fulfilling these demands. Recently, nanomaterial-based sensor technology has drawn considerable attention towards the development of sensing applications such as H2S gas sensors. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas is a colorless, poisonous, and corrosive gas that generates harmful effect on the nervous system of human-being at low concentrations and causes death at higher concentrations. H2S often results from the bacterial breakdown of organic matter in the absence of oxygen, thus, it exists in natural gas with a percentage up to 90%, and by far the largest industrial route to H2S occurs in petroleum refineries.In this work, novel H2S gas sensor has been fabricated using inorganic metal-oxide nanoparticles embedded in polymer membranes of organic material. The copper-oxide nanoparticles are fabricated by colloid microwave-thermal method that enables a precise size control. Different concentrations of nanoparticles and 5% of ionic liquid are added to a solution of PVA to produce polymer membranes. The produced membranes are flexible and having semiconducting properties. The membrane is encapsulated between two electrical electrodes where the top electrode exhibits a grid structure. While applying a constant voltage across the electrodes, the electrical current response signal is measured. The measurements reveal that at low temperatures these sensors are highly sensitive to H2S gas with low concentrations of 10 PPM. The result revealed that the best response to H2S gas for all sensors was obtained at 80°C. As a result, the power consumed to heat up the sensor is reduced by almost 90%. The fabricated sensors are very selective to H2S, and exhibit fast response. Moreover, these sensors are cheap, easy to manufacture and consume less power. Thus, they have the potential to be used for industrial applications in petroleum refineries.

Time:
12:30 - 12:55

Title: High-throughput, parallel atomic force microscope

Hamed Sadeghian
Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, The Netherlands

Biography

Dr. Hamed Sadeghian received his PhD (Cum Laude) in 2010 from Delft University of Technology. He then continued his career as a research associate and develop several nano-opto-mechanical instruments for nano-scale interaction measurement. He is currently one of the Principal Scientists at TNO. His research group NOMI focuses on development of Instruments where the core is based on interaction of electromagnetic or mechanical waves with matters, with a focus on industrial and societal applications. Examples are development of the parallel AFM as a sub-nm, high throughput metrology and inspection solution for Semiconductor industry, high resolution optical microscopy with metainstruments and 3D nanotomography to resolve invisible nanostructures under the surface. He is also the scientific leader of Early research program (ERP) 3D nanomanufacturing Instruments at TNO. In the last 5 years he has participated in several European Union funded projects and proposals, such as E450EDL, E450LMDAP, SenaTe, Value4Nano and 3DAM. In 2014 he also received his MBA degree from Leuven Vlerick Business School, Belgium. He was also a co-founder of Jahesh Poulad Co. (2002), which designs, manufactures and installs mechanical and electrical equipment for steel industries. Dr. Sadeghian holds more than 30 patents, and has authored more than 50 technical papers and co-authored a book. He is a member of editorial advisory board of Sensors & Transducers Journal. He is also a member of technical committee of SENSORDEVICES conference since 2010 till present. He is also a recipient of several best paper awards. In 2012 he was awarded as “TNO excellent researcher”.

Abstract

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an essential nanoinstrument technique for several applications such as cell biology and nanoelectronics metrology and inspection. The need for statistically significant sample sizes means that data collection can be an extremely lengthy process in AFM. The use of a single AFM instrument is known for its very low speed and not being suitable for scanning large areas, resulting in very-low-throughput measurement. We address this challenge by parallelizing AFM instruments. The parallelization is achieved by miniaturizing the AFM instrument and operating many of them simultaneously. This nanoinstrument has the advantages that each miniaturized AFM can be operated independently and that the advances in the field of AFM, both in terms of speed and imaging modalities, can be implemented more easily. Moreover, a parallel AFM instrument also allows one to measure several physical parameters simultaneously; while one instrument measures nano-scale topography, another instrumentcan measure mechanical, electrical or thermal properties, making it a Lab-on-an-Instrument. In this paper, a proof of principle (PoP) of such a parallel AFM instrument has been demonstrated by analyzing the topography of large samples such as semiconductor wafers. This nanoinstrument provides new research opportunities in the nanometrology of wafers and nanolithography masks by enabling real die-to-die and wafer-level measurements and in cell biology by measuring the nano-scale properties of a large number of cells.

Time:
14:00 - 14:25

Title: Antibacterial properties of cuprous oxide nanoparticles against staphylococcus aureus

Kashi N. Prasad
Institute of Medical Sciences, India

Biography

Dr Kashi Nath Prasad completed his MD from Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. He is Professor of Microbiology at Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, a tertiary care referral hospital in North India. He has guided 16 PhD and 10 MD students. He has published more than 200 scientific papers, mostly in reputed International Journals. H has received several awards by different Academic Bodies and Scientific Societies. He is a Fellow of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, International Congress of Environmental Research, National Academy of Medical Sciences (India) and Indian Academy of Tropical Parasitology. He has been invited speaker in more than 50 National and International events.

Abstract

Antimicrobial properties of copper ions and salts are well known. Antibacterial activities of cuprous oxide nanoparticles (Cu2O-NPs) against Staphylococcus aureus, especially strains like vancomycin intermediate S. aureus (VISA) and heterogeneous vancomycin intermediate S. aureus (hVISA) with thickened cell wall, have not been studied. Hence we evaluated the antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of Cu2O-NPs against hVISA and VISA strains since such strains are emerging global health care problems and they show poor clinical response to vancomycin therapy. Nanoscaled octahedral Cu2O-NPs were generated by solution phase technology. Field emission electron microscopy demonstrated particles size ranged from 100-150 nm. Five bacterial strains, S. aureus (ATCC 29213), Mu3 (hVISA), Mu50 (VISA), and two clinical hVISA isolates (St1745, B10760) were used in this study. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) of Cu2O-NPs to these strains were determined by broth dilution technique. Bacterial membrane damaging properties of Cu2O-NPs were studied by leakage of cellular constituents, uptake of ethidium bromide (ETBr) and propidium iodide (PI), and binding of vancomycin-bodipy (dipyrromethene boron difluoride [4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diazas- indacene] fluorescent dye) to bacterial cell wall. Cu2O-NPs inhibited the growth of hVISA and VISA strains and showed antibiofilm activity. MIC and MBIC of Cu2O-NPs ranged from 625µg/ml to 5000µg/ml and 2500µg/ml to 10,000µg/ml, respectively. Bacterial exposure to Cu2O-NPs caused leakage of cellular constituents and increased uptake of ETBr and PI by bacteria. Significant reduction in vancomycin-bodipy binding to bacterial cell wall and reduction in viable bacterial counts in presence of 7.5% sodium chloride were also observed. Assessment of Cu2O-NPs toxicity by haemolysis assay showed no cytotoxic effect at concentrations between 625 and 10000 μg/ml. In conclusion, Cu2O-NPS are capable of disrupting cell membrane of S. aureus including VISA and hVISA strains and reducing their biofilm formation with no apparent in vitro cytotoxicity. The above observations suggest use of Cu2O-NPs as effective anti-staphylococcal and antibiofilm agents on medical devices. Further studies of these nanoparticles on other microbial species including yeasts and assessment of their in-vivo toxicity are required for future clinical applications.

Time:
14:25 - 14:50

Title: Green synthesis of magnesium hydroxide Mg(OH)2 NPs and magnesium oxide MgONPs nanoparticles using olea europea leaf extrac

Alaa Y. Ghidan
Jordan University, Jordan

Biography

The presenter Alaa Y. Ghidan, the PhD Student at the Jordan University, and she has two publications about the same field of nanotechnology, synthesis as an eco-friendly method.

Abstract

Synthesis approach to synthesize magnesium hydroxide (MgHNPs) and magnesium oxide (MgONPs) nanoparticles using Olea europea leaf aqueous extract in one-pot reaction. The synthesized magnesium hydroxide and oxide nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS).

Sessions:
Micro and Nanoparticle, Nanoelectronics and Biomedical Devices

Time:

Session Chair:

Sanboh Lee
National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan

Time:

Session Co-Chair:

Choon-Gi Choi
Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Korea

Time:
14:50 - 15:15

Title: Photosystem I from the thermophilic cyanobacterium thermosyncecoccuselongatus for photobiotechnology

Athina Zouni
Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany

Biography

Prof. Dr. Athina Zouni studied chemistry at the Free University of Berlin. After receiving her doctorate in biophysical chemistry, she broadened her knowledge in biophysical methods at the Max Planck Society`s Fritz Haber Institute in Berlin. In 1995, she signed up for the glorious adventure of photosynthesis research at the Technical University of Berlin involving work on the crystallization, X-ray structure analysis and function of photosystem II. Her successes in the field of photosynthesis led in 2009 to her habilitation and appointment as a Visiting Professor in the Chemistry Faculty at Technical University in Berlin. In 2012, she relocated her lab to the Department of Biology at Berlin`s Humboldt University, where the focus of her research is now the “Biophysics of Photosynthesis”. In the last years, she has invested her energy in the field of biotechnology applications of photosystem I as an important model for approaches to artificial photosynthesis.

Abstract

Oxygenic photosynthesis is the energetic basis of virtually all life on earth. Photosynthetic organisms employ two large pigment-protein supercomplexes (so called photosystems) to drive the light reactions. Photosystem I (PSI) catalyses the light-induced electron transfer from plastocyanin or cytochrome (cyt)c6 to ferredoxin (ultimately to NADP). The X-ray structure of PSI from T. elongatus at 2.5 Å resolution revealed a trimeric protein consisting of 12 peptide subunits and 127 cofactors per monomer1. The high stability of PSI from T. elongatus renders it suitable for biotechnological applications. Our focus is on biophotoelectrodes2. Coupling cyt c from horse heart to a gold electrode and letting PSI bind to the coupled cyt c aligns the PSI, producing a unidirectional photocurrent3. Interestingly, horse heart cyt c is a better electron donor to PSI than the native cyt c6. Until today, there is no clear localization of the binding site of cyt c on PSI. We have been able to construct a biophotoelectrode with cytc and PSI2 and further improved it by introducing a DNA-scaffold3. To further elucidate the cyt c binding site, we have measured the interaction between horse heart cyt c and T. elongatus PSI and found low pH and low salt concentrations to be beneficial for the formation of a stable complex. Crystallization of PSI in the presence of cyt c gives crystals with a ~1:1 ratio of both proteins. Knowledge about the binding site will help to improve biotechnological applications and the understanding of the interaction in nature.

Time:
15:15 - 15:40

Title: Electric field-induced pillar patterns on PMMA thin film

Sanboh Lee
National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan

Biography

Professor Sanboh Lee has been endowed Tsing Hua Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University since 2003. He was a visiting professor at Lehigh University (1987-1988) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (1996-1997, 2003-2004). He has also been received numerous awards. To name several of those awards, he was the recipient of 1998 Roon Foundation Award from Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology, the recipient of 2000 Ho Chin Tui Award. He has also awarded ASM International Fellow in 2004 and Fellow of Materials Science Society-Taiwan in 2009. He has been Tsing Hua Chair Professor since 2006. He has been the Adjunct professor of Beijing University of Science and Technology since 2005. He is a member of ASM International, TMS, American Physical Society, and Materials Research Society. He published more than 230 articles in peer-reviewed international journals.

Abstract

Self-assembly of polymer nano and microstructure has demonstrated the potential of constructing periodical structure on the surface of polymer film. The surface instability of polymer films through the interaction between molecules and surround medium such as electric field and thermal gradient is the driving force to form surface pattern. Considered the potential applications of surface structures on PMMA substrates in the patterning of metal films for plasmonics and flexible electronics. We investigated the temporal evolution of pillars formed on PMMA films between two parallel plates under the action of an electric field. A simple model was developed to analyze the growth of a liquid pillar under the action of an electric field between two parallel electrodes. A quadratic relationship between time and the diameter of the pillar was obtained. The diameter of the pillar increases with time. Large electric field assists the growth of the liquid pillar, while a liquid with a large viscosity hinders the growth of the liquid pillar. The field-induced formation and growth of PMMA pillars on PMMA films were observed using the configuration of a parallel capacitor. Pillars of larger sizes and smaller densities were formed on thicker PMMA films than on thinner PMMA films. The root mean square diameter of the pillars increases with the increase of the annealing time and annealing temperature. The growth behavior of the pillars can be described by an Arrhenius relation with an activation energy of 24.4 kJ/mol, suggesting that the growth of the pillars is controlled by a thermal activation process.

Time:
15:40 - 16:05

Title: Artificially intelligent imaging (AI2): CMOS imaging & standard CMOS moving together in 3D nanoscale integration and even impacting PVS

Faycal Saffih
University of Waterloo, Canada

Biography

Dr. Faycal Saffih (IEEE, 2000) received B.Sc. (Best Honors) in Physics from University of Setif-1, Algeria, in 1996, M.Sc. degree in Physics from University of Malaya, Malaysia, in 1998, and Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Waterloo, Canada, in 2005. In 2006, he joined the Communication Research Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, where he developed a versatile FPGA-based prototype for biomedical smart imaging application known as the wireless endoscopic capsule. Dr. Faycal Saffih joined Voxtel Inc., OR, USA, as Senior Analog Active Pixel Sensor engineer, designing imagers based on SOI-CMOS technology for the CMOS imagers used in high-energy physics detection, and electrons microscopy imaging. From 2009 until 2012, he joined KAUST as Research Fellow where incepted his invention on Smart Nano-photonic devices dedicated for imaging and solar energy harvesting. He recently got certified from Renewables Academy (RENAC: www.renac.de), Germany, for developing Renewable Energy projects.

Abstract

In this talk we will present our approach of Artificially-Intelligent Implementations (AI2) in the multi-disciplinary area of CMOS Imaging. Inspired by the Biological Vision systems, we took the top-down approach: From system level, down to circuits, down to devices reaching the hot topic of 3D CMOS Imaging at the device level which (currently and is) predicted to have a huge impact in the coming years not only on CMOS imaging but in the overall Integrated Circuits design technologies. Dedicated initially to Smart CMOS imaging, the novel technology is the application of choice where multi-disciplines (Biology, Optics, Devices’ CAD/CAE, and finally Nano-Fabrication) will interact to suggest a novel approach for the quest to design intelligent devices needed in a variety of advanced technological devices and systems including Solar energy harvesting Photovoltaics. As natural evolution, we will show our research on taking the benefits achieved from 3D Smart CMOS Imagers and applying them on Photovoltaics technology to design an intelligent High Efficiency solar energy harvesting. The talk will show this fascinating dynamics and open doors to potential future fields of research and development.

Time:
16:20 - 16:45

Title: Graphene oxide-calcium phosphate: The revolutionary nanomaterial for bone regeneration

Lucia G. Delogu
University of Sassari, Italy

Biography

Dr. Lucia Gemma Delogu has been an Assistant Professor at the University of Sassari (UNISS), Sardinia, Italy since 2012. She received her Ph.D. title in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the UNISS in Italy. She has worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles USA (2007-2009) and was a visiting researcher at the Sanford-Burnham Institute of San Diego, CA USA in 2008 and at the Department of Health and Human Services at the NIH in Bethesda, MD USA in 2013. Today, Dr. Delogu leads the Laboratory of Bionanotechnology in the Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, UNISS Italy.

Abstract

Nanotechnology strategies for tissue engineering in creating implantable tissues have been viewed as the most promising technology for regenerating damaged tissues such us bone. Indeed nanomaterial scan increase the cell growth, differentiation and tissue regeneration. In this context graphene and its derivatives possess intrinsic characteristics for tissue engineering applications enhancing i.e. the osteogenic differentiation (Dubey et al., Stem Cells Int, 2015). However, is well known how also the immune system, especially monocytes, play an important role guiding the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in osteoblast (Nicolaidou et al., PloS one, 2012). As previously demonstrated graphene oxide (GO), with small lateral dimension was able to induce specific activation stimuli on monocytes (Orecchioni et al., Advanced Healthcare Materials, 2016). Herein, we combined the immune modulatory proprieties of GO and the well-recognized osteoinductivity capacity of calcium phosphates (CaP) in a novel unique biocompatible nanomaterial called GO-CaP improving the bone-regeneration. The GO-CaP osteoinductive proprieties were investigated analyzing several aspects from the bone matrix formation to the expression of several markers such as ALP, OCN and BMPs in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, this new material was able to facilitate osteoblast-differentiation of hMSC in a co-culture with monocytes. This action of GO-CaP was confirmed also in vivowithout any adverse inflammatory reactions. Microcomputed-tomography revealed an increase of trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and trabecular relative volume (BV/TV) in GO-CaP treated mice. From a public health perspective, GO-CaP could become a promising therapeutic material able to support and improve the bone regeneration therapy.

Time:
16:45 - 17:10

Title: Properties-controllable graphene synthesis and applications in electronics and photonics

Choon-Gi Choi
Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Korea

Biography

Choon-Gi Choireceived the doctorate in Physics from Universitéd’Orléans, Francein 1996. He is currently a head of Graphene Research Center at Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Korea and a professor at the department of advanced device technology in University of Science and Technology (UST) of Korea. He is also an associate editor of the Nano Convergence with Springer publishing.From 1996 until now, he is working for the ETRI, where he has developed micro- and nano-photonic and optoelectronic devices, and graphene-based electronic and photonic devices. His current research interests are single crystal graphene synthesis, graphene-based electronic and photonic devices, metamaterial-based holographic devices, wearable and flexible devices, etc. He has authored or co-authored over 100 papers and holds over 20 U.S. patents as well as 50 Korean patents.

Abstract

Graphene has attracted enormous interest with excellent electronic and photonic properties. Its charge mobility, electrical conductivity and optical transparency in addition to its flexibility, robustness and environmental stability make graphene a promising material for a wide range of applications ranging from electronics to photonics. However, its true potential application will not be attained until production compatible methods are achieved. In this talk I present CVD (chemical vapor deposition) based large-scale properties-controllablegraphene synthesis. I introduce a method which controls the optical transmittance and the electrical resistance of graphene sheet using a planar mesh pattern of single and multi-layer graphenes. I also demonstrate a flexible and transparent gas molecule sensor consisting of both graphene sensor channel and graphene heater. This combined structure leads to fully utilizing unique transparent and flexible functionalities of graphene with invariable sensing performance under a bending condition. I introduce the progress in graphene-based photonic and plasmonic devices such as thermo-optic mode extinction modulator and planar lightwave circuit-type plasmonic photodetector for all graphene-based photonic integrated circuits (PICs). A thermo-optic (TO) mode extinction modulator based on graphene plasmonic waveguide is introduced. The graphene plasmonic waveguide is served as a light signal guiding medium with a successful 2.5 Gbps optical signal transmission at a wavelength of 1.31 μm. A planar-type graphene plasmonic photodetector is also demonstratedwith the configuration of the graphene plasmonic waveguide and photodetector structure all-in-one to detect horizontally incident light for the easy and simple integration.

Time:
17:10 - 17:35

Title: Application of nanotechnology and stem cell technology in the next generation cardiovascular implants

Hossein Ghanbari
Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Biography

Dr. Ghanbari obtained his medical degree (MD) from Tehran University of Medical Sciences on 2002 and then joined to the Centre for Nanotechnology & Regenerative Medicine, University College London to do a PhD on Regenerative Nanomedicine (2007-2011). After completing his PhD, he joined the RAFT Institute in London as a Post-Doctoral fellow to conduct research on skin replacement “Smart Matrix”. Then, he moved to Tehran University of Medical Sciences and started his job as a faculty member of School of Advanced technologies in Medicine, Department of Medical Nanotechnology. His research interest is application of nanotechnology in regenerative medicine, stem cell therapy and tissue engineering. He has also a broad experience on the development of next generation cardiovascular implants using nanotechnology and stem cell technology. He is co-founder of “Research Center for Advanced Technologies in Cardiovascular Medicine”, located at Tehran Heart Center, one of the most advanced cardiovascular medical center in Iran.

Abstract

Emerging advanced technologies such as nanotechnology offers great potential to overcome current issue in different fields including biomedical field. Development novel diagnostics and nanobiosensors, new therapeutics based on smart delivery systems and nanocarriers as well as multifunctional theranostics has opened new horizons to current medical practice. Application of nanotechnology in the field of biomedical and cardiovascular devices has attracted research attention in recent years1. Development of new nanomaterials and nanocomposite hybrids with enhanced bio and hemocompatibility and improved mechanical and physicochemical properties offers great advantages over conventional materials2. Based on these advanced materials, development of next generation biomedical devices has become achievable. Merging nanotechnology with other advanced technologies such as stem cell technology and regenerative medicine principals in development of next generation viable or semi-viable devices is a new paradigm in biomedical research. In this paper we will report our findings of development of next generation cardiovascular devices such as heart valve, coronary stents and bypass grafts based on nanotechnology and regenerative medicine principals. The results of multiple tests to investigate bio and hemocompatibility, mechanical and surface properties and self-endothelialisation potential were very promising. This indicates that future prospect of the application of nanotechnology and stem cell technology in development of next generation cardiovascular devices is bright.

Keynote Speaker

Time:

Title: Nanotechnology: Scope and safety challenges

Hassan El Fawal
American University in Cairo, Egypt

Biography

Hassan A. N. El-Fawal is Professor of Neuroscience, Toxicology and Pharmacology and Dean of the School of Sciences and Engineering at the American University in Cairo (AUC). Prior to joining AUC in 2016, he was Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Dean of the School of Health Sciences at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in New York. He was previously Assistant Chair and Chair of Natural Sciences and Professor of Health Sciences at Mercy College from 1997 to 2009. The focus of his research is diagnostic and prognostic neuroimmune biomarkers for neurodegeneration, neurotoxicity and the evaluation of therapeutics, as well as cardiopulmonary disease. He earned a B. Sc. from Alexandria University, Egypt in 1979, and an M.Sc. from the University of Guelph in Canada. His Ph.D. in Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, was earned at Virginia Tech in 1989. From 1989 to 1997 he worked as Research Assistant Professor at NYU School of Medicines Institute of Environmental Medicine.

Abstract

Nanotechnology promises to revolutionize a wide variety of industries and provide innovative ways to improve human and environmental well-being, including diagnosis and treatment of diseases, whether cardiovascular, neurodegenerative (ND), or oncological conditions, as well as mitigate ecological impact of human activity. However, what is often ignored is the flip-side of this nano-revolution, the safety profile of many engineered nanomaterials(NM), including those with potential for therapeutic use. The Janus nature of nanotechnology and scope of its impact need to be addressed in order to provide a sound basis for use and avoid potential toxicity. The issues to be addressed in this context include occupational exposure, the environmental kinetics and dynamics, NM behavior during the intended use of products that incorporate NM and the handling of these products at the end of their projected life-span. To date, little or no consensus has been given to the evaluation of NM and the cross-talk that needs to take place between stakeholders, including those in the field of nanomedicine and where many applications are potentially forthcoming. Toxicologically, NM have redefined many cornerstone principles of the field, where it is no longer simply dose, but the physico-chemical properties (shape, charge, agglomeration), inclusive of size, that may define the toxicity level. This is relevant when we consider that lethality no longer defines toxicity, but rather the adverse effect occurring at the genomic, genetic, biochemical, physiological or morphological level that may lead to acute or chronic impairment of function. In that context, NM have been demonstrated to precipitate oxidative stress, immune activation, autoimmune responses (AI), act as haptens, accumulate in the nervous system, and induce cardiovascular lesions. Interestingly, some of these same activities make them desirable therapeutically for targeted drug delivery in cancer and ND. By way of demonstration, this lecture draws on our own interests in ND and AI and our experiences in therapeutics, where NM formulations may improve efficacy and reduce toxicity, and in the environmental toxicology where NM may precipitate toxicities not previously described with bulk materials. This talk highlights the scope of safety challenges associated with NM, the promising advances in the use of NM in improving the treatment of diverse diseases, and calls for an implementation science approach for ensuring safety of NM. It is intended for both those conversant with bionanotechnology and those new to the field.

Keynote Speaker

Time:
11:00 - 11:45

Title: T-Patterns in human and neuronal interactions and on DNA: Self-similarity and translation symmetry in time and space

Magnus S. Magnusson
University of Iceland, Iceland

Biography

Magnus S Magnusson, PHD, Research Professor, created the T-pattern model with detection algorithms (THEMETM, PatternVision). Co-directed a two-year DNA analysis project. Numerous papers and invited talks and keynotes at conferences within ethology, mathematical sciences, neuroscience, bioinformatics, proteomics, mass spectroscopy and at leading universities in Europe, Japan and the US. Deputy Director 1983-1988 in the National Museum of Natural History, Paris and 1988 to 1993 invited Professor at the University of Paris (V, VIII & XIII) in Psychology and Ethology (biology of behavior). Since 1991 founder and director of the Human Behavior Laboratory, University of Iceland, leading member of a formalized network of 24 universities based on “Magnusson’s analytical model” initiated at the University of Paris V, Sorbonne, Paris, in 1995.

Abstract

The research presented here began in the seventies in Ethology, the biology of behavior, focusing on animal and human interactions and led to the development of a particular kind of statistical repeated hierarchical self-similar multi-variate (fractal) patterns on a single dimension, called T-Patterns, with corresponding T-pattern detection and Analysis (TPA) Windows software called THEMETM (PatternVision Ltd). T-patterns have since been detected in many different kinds of animal and human behavior and interactions (see Casarrubea et al, 2015, comprehensive review, J. Neuroscience Methods; Anolli et al eds. 2005, IOS Press; Magnusson et al eds. 2016, Springer). In a fractal universe, self-similarity may be expected anywhere and a search for T-patterns in the firing of neurons in close proximity in the olfactory bulb of rat brains, registered using implanted electronic chips, resulted in the detection of numerous complex multi-neuron T-patterns with highly significant statistical validations and external validation through strong correlations with breathing and physiological state (Nicol et al, 2015, J. Neuroscience Methods). The structure of T-patterns, moreover, turns out to have striking similarities with DNA patterns such as genes and with proteins and TPA of such data is ongoing with the Theme software. The T-pattern and the specially developed algorithms are described and illustrative results are presented. The possible existence of T-patterns as well in the time domain of molecular processes is discussed as well as some functional analogies between T-patterns in human behavior within human societies and DNA and protein T-patterns in biological cells or Cell City.

Sessions:
Materials for Energy and Environment, Nanobiotechnology & Nanomedicine

Time:

Session Chair:

Ncholu Manyala
University of Pretoria, South Africa

Time:

Session Co-Chair:

Sudhir Kumar Sharma
New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE

Time:
11:45-12:10

Title: From pinecone biomass to three-dimensional porous activated carbon for supercapacitive electrodes

Ncholu Manyala
University of Pretoria, South Africa

Biography

Prof. Ncholu Manyala is Professor of Physics and Chair of South African research chair initiative (SARChI) in Carbon Technology and Materials at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. Prof. Manyala got his PhD from Louisiana State University working on low temperature transport and magnetic properties of strongly correlated materials where published two papers in Nature and one in Nature Materials in this field. Prof. Manyala’s recent research interest is on graphene based materials and their applications in energy storage and sensing. Prof. Manyala has published more than 40 papers in this subject. Prof. Manyala is the member of International Society of Electrochemistry.

Abstract

Considering the gradual consumption of fossils fuels, it is imperative to develop schemes that are sustainable for socio-economic development of our society to meet the high energy demands. The performance of supercapacitive material largely depends on the interaction between electrode materials and the electrolyte ions. In this regard, we investigate the electrochemical behaviour of activated carbon produced by employing pine cones biomass waste as the carbon source in different aqueous electrolytes. The produced activated carbon exhibited a specific surface area of 1160.3 m2 g-1 with a high mesopore volume. The fabricated electrode material could deliver a specific capacitance of 200 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1 in 1 M H2SO4 in three electrode configuration. Symmetric device fabricated based on the prepared carbon exhibited a maximum specific capacitance of 113 F g–1 at 0.25 A g–1 1 by galvanostatic charge–discharge tests in the same electrolyte with cycle stability up to 5000 cycles. We anticipate that pine cone biomass could be a viable and sustainable source of the carbon material for supercapacitor application if fully explored.

Time:
12:10 - 12:35

Title: The effect of generation and Ph of the new acceptor PAMAM dendritic materials on the organic bilayer solar cells performance

Thamraa Alshahrani
Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman University, Saudi Arabia

Biography

Dr. Thamraa Alshahrani received her BSc degree in physics from the University of King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia in 2007, and an MSc in Nanotechnology and Microfabrication from Bangor University, UK, in 2010. She was awarded a PhD from Bangor University, UK, for work on the Advanced Materials for Organic Solar Cells: Influence of Generation and pH on PAMAM-Based Devices in the year 2016. Currently she is Assistant Professor in physics department, college of science in Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Particular areas of her interest is Implementing nanotechnology in renewable energy.

Abstract

Due to the importance of harvesting solar energy, the continuous development of solar cells is one of the most important developments in the conversion of solar energy. Recently, organic solar cells show many advantages over inorganic devices such as lightweight, flexibility, low cost and variety materials synthesis with different structures However, organic solar cells efficiency is still below 10% and it’s affected by many factors such as the choice of materials and fabrication techniques. Dendrimers are a new class of polymeric materials that are composed of highly branched, well-defined and nature monodisperse macromolecules, which can support the charge transport and film morphology. Multifunctional Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers as flexible light harvesting antennae with high efficiency electron transfer was used as the acceptor while Poly (3- hexylthiophene) (P3HT) was used as donor due to their low band-gap and efficiency in organic photovoltaic applications. This work investigate the effect of generation and pH of the new PAMAM dendritic wedges (G0.5, G1.5, G2.5) salt on the organic bilayer solar cells in order to improve their performance and morphology. The structure with (G0.5, G1.5, G2.5) salts at neutral pH level resulted in much improved surface morphology and enhances the charge mobility. It was observed thatincreasing PAMAM dendritic generation from G0.5 to G2.5 influence significantly the bilayer OHJ solar cells efficiency performance. Power-conversion efficiencies (PCE) of 7% were achieved at the natural PAMAM G2.5.Thin films of PAMAM at neutral pH exhibits a major peripheral distribution where in the low pH it was found to be shrink.

Time:
12:35 - 13:00

Title: Green synthesis of GO-ZnO nanocomposite and ultrasound assisted application of the same for AZO dye adsorption

Priya Banerjee
University of Calcutta, India

Biography

Priya Banerjee is a Ph.D. fellow at the Department of Environmental Science, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India. After completion of her masters from the Department of Environmental Science, University of Calcutta, she had worked in many reputed institutes at Kolkata, India and has successfully published all work performed so far in national and international journals. She has also participated in several national and international conferences (oral and poster) and was awarded twice for best poster. Her present research focusses on synthesis, characterization and application of graphene oxide based nanocomposites for efficient treatmentof dye-rich wastewater.

Abstract

Reactive azo dyes appearing in almost all streams of wastewater reportedly possess carcinogenic and mutagenic properties and are often biorecalcitrant in nature. In recent years, the process of adsorption has received much significance as one of the most efficient, easy to operate and cost effective procedures implemented for treatment of effluents containing different types of dyes. The present study was performed to investigate the potential of Graphene oxide (GO) – Zinc oxide nanoparticle (ZnONPs) nanocomposites as an inexpensive, convenient and non-toxic adsorbent for removal of Methylene blue (MB) from solution. The AgNPs used in this study were synthesized in a green route from leaf extracts of basil (Ocimumtenuiflorum). The adsorption phenomenon was catalyzed by ultrasound to achieve higher rates of removal in significantly reduced time. The process was optimized using Response Surface Methodology and modeled with Artificial Neural Network to obtain highest dye removal efficiency and analyzed in terms of varying experimental conditions, kinetics, thermodynamics and isotherms as well. Approximately 99.87% removal of upto 120 ppm dye was achieved in 6 min using only 0.75 g L1 GO-ZnONP nanocomposite as adsorbent. Characterization of this nanocomposite (using Electron Microscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) depicted changes in the surface morphology and chemical properties of the adsorbent resulting from MB uptake. Antibacterial properties of the GO-ZnONP nanocomposite was also determined and found to be higher than its individual components. Results indicated that the fabricated adsorbent was highly efficient and may be investigated further for treatment of real effluents.

Time:
14:00 - 14:25

Title: Synthesis of hollow mesoporous silica nanospheres using sacrificial polystyrene templates for drug delivery applications

Mohd Qasim
University of Hyderabad, India

Biography

Mohd Qasim obtained B.Sc. (Hons) in Chemistry, M.Sc. in Physical Chemistry and MTech in Nanotechnology from the Aligarh Muslim University, India. Currently, he is pursuing PhD in Nanoscience and Technology at the School of Engineering Sciences and Technology (SEST), University of Hyderabad, India under the supervision of Dr. Dibakar Das. His research interest mainly covers development of multifunctional nanomaterials and its applications. He published several research papers in refereed Journals and conference proceedings and has presented his research work in various national and international conferences.

Abstract

Hollow mesoporous silica nanospheres (hmSiO2 NSs), with large cavity and permeable mesoporous shell, have recently gained increasing attention owing to their application potential in cancer imaging and therapy. In this work, we have reported the synthesis of hmSiO2 NPs, using polystyrene (PS) nanospheres as sacrificial template, by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) in presence of CTAB and subsequent characterizations for structural, morphological and thermal properties. This method involves the synthesis of polystyrene nanospheres as core template followed by in situ deposition of mesoporous silica on the PS spheres and removal of the inner PS core and CTAB on calcination to produce hmSiO2 NSs. The structural, morphological and thermal properties of hmSiO2 NSs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). TEM analysis confirmed the spherical morphology of hmSiO2 NSs with diameter in the range of 200–300 nm and wall thickness ~ 100 nm with pore diameter ~ 2-4 nm. The outer surfaces of hmSiO2 NSs were further functionalized with polymer and investigated for drug-delivery application by an in vitro method using doxorubicin as a model drug. MTT assays on macrophages cells demonstrated the non-toxic nature of both bare and polymer coated hmSiO2 NSs. Thus, prepared nanoparticles with high surface area, large pore volume, good chemical and thermal stability, water dispersibility and low toxicity show promising potential for applications in biomedical field including targeted drug delivery in cancer diagnosis and treatment in near future.

Time:
14:25 - 14:50

Title: RESS processing of naproxen via supercritical technologies

Sudhir Kumar Sharma
New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE

Biography

Sudhir Kumar Sharma obtained masters (MSc Physics and MTech Materials) from Department of Physics, Barkatullah University (formerly Bhopal University) Bhopal, India. In 2007, he received his PhD from the Indian Institute of Science Bangalore (IISc. Bangalore), India under the supervision of Prof. S. Mohan. During his PhD, Sharma worked on the development of shape memory micro-actuators for biomedical applications. As post-doctoral fellow, he joined Centre for Nano Science and Engineering (CeNSE), IISc. Bangalore. In Nov. 2013, Dr. Sudhir moved to New York University Abu Dhabi as a research associate. Currently, he is working as a Research Scientist at New York University Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) UAE. His research interest includes implementation of supercritical technologies for nanoparticle synthesis, Smart materials for micro-sensors and actuators, MEMS/NEMS and micro/nano-fabrications, vacuum science, and thin film technology.

Abstract

Background: It is well known that poor water solubility of pharmaceutical compounds pose significant challenges in drug bio-availability and new drug development. For example, Naproxen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is a biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) class II drug whose bioavailability is rate-limited by its dissolution. Particle size reduction has been used to improve the bioavailability of Naproxen using various micronization techniques. Results: In the present manuscript, we report a custom designed, constant (P,T) rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS) processing of Naproxen drug, in supercritical CO2. A chamber pressure of 300 bar and 50 oC was maintained constant throughout the experiments. RESS chamber was depressurized through a capillary tubing and formulations were collected in a collection vessel cooled at liquid nitrogen temperatures in ‘dry ice’ form. This ‘dry ice’ was gradually dissolved in DI water, which resulted in a clear solution containing dissolved naproxen. These solutions were drop casted on a silicon substrate and ambient dried overnight resulting in stable, viscous films. Generally, Naproxen is a solid powder with melting points of 154o C under ambient conditions. Compositional and structural characterization of the films confirmed their chemical identity as naproxen. Conclusions:The discovery of liquid-like naproxen films could result in new, oral drug-delivery techniques and would effectively address the poor water solubility problems of the drug. We are applying the sc-CO2 processing strategy for other pharmaceuticals.

Time:
14:50 - 15:15

Title: Design and analysis of graphene-based terahertz band nano antenna

Sonia Bansal
YMCA University of Science and Technology, India

Biography

Dr. Sonia Bansal is an Assistant Professor in YMCA University of Science and Technology, Faridabad. Her current research interests include Nanotechnology. She received her PhD Degree from Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi and M.Tech degree in Computer Engineering. She has published 14 International paper in International Journals and presented 48 papers in National & International Conferences. She is having more than 12 years teaching and research experience. Dr. Sonia Bansal is member of Materials Research Society of India (MRSI) and senior member of International Association of Computer Science and Information Technology (IACSIT)

Abstract

Graphene-enabled wireless communication constitutes a novel paradigm which has been proposed to implement wireless communications at the nanoscale. Indeed, graphene based nano-antennas just a few micrometers in size have been predicted to radiate electromagnetic waves at the terahertz band. In this work, the performance of a graphene-based Nano-patch antenna in transmission and reception is numerically analyzed. The resonance frequency of the nano-antenna is calculated as a function of its length and width, both analytically and by simulation. The influence of the variation in the height of the patch on the return loss is also evaluated. The return loss and the band width of the graphene- based Nano-patch antenna is compared to that of an equivalent metallic antenna. Finally, we do the analysis of the radiation pattern, gain, and smith chart of a graphene-based Nano-patch antenna. These results will prove useful for designers of future graphene-based nano-antennas, which will enable wireless communications at the Nano scale.

Time:
15:15 - 15:40

Title: Identifying common and specific genes in field of cancer

Dayana Carla de Macedo
State University of Centro-Oeste, Brazil

Biography

Dayana Carla de Macedo received the Technologist Degree in Food Technology from Federal Technological University of Parana, Ponta Grossa in 2009, the Administrator Degree in Administration from State University of Ponta Grossa in 2010, Paraná and the Master Degree in Production Engineering from Federal Technological University of Parana, Ponta Grossa in 2012. Doctoral Degree in Production Engineering. Her current research interest are data mining and framework in cancer field.

Abstract

Identifying common and specific genes in field of cancer is a hard task. Thus, was developed a method to identify a common and specific genes using dimensionality reduction through DRM-F method. This research made the comparison of two methods of reduction: the Method of Attributes Selection and the Method based on Framework, called DRM-F. This comparison aimed to evaluate the proposed method with the existing method in data mining, Attribute Selection. The DRM-F method based on Framework the adapted Ben-Abdalhal et al method was used. (2004). These two methods were applied in the field of gene expression and three bases were also used, as follows DLCBL, DLCBL tumor about leukemia ALL / AML containing lymphoma data. These sets have already been used by Borges and Nievola in their studies. The three sets of data were extracted from the analysis from the biomedical data repository Kent Ridge. Analyzing the results obtained, using as criteria for evaluating the Cross Validation, where it was found that the use of the methods resulted in an improvement in the values of accuracy rate when compared with the bases possessing all the attributes in the domain of gene expression. In this domain the best reduction method was using the Wrapper approach in the three bases. Nevertheless, it is noteworthy that the proposed method outperformed the 80% rate of accuracy results, which may not be considered a reduction method with poor performance. The results were approximate to the original base set containing all the attributes. Taking into account that the search criterion of the proposed method is based on the identification of common and specific attributes among the analyzed bases of the chosen domain. The proposed method aims to search the equivalence and generalization of attributes in the study domain. By means of effective results for the proposed (DRM-F) method in generation of predictive models it was decided to make a biological analysis for the common attributes (common Entrez IDs) identified among the three bases to seek insights or even new discoveries and biological meanings of these attributes. Thus, the common Entrez IDs among the three bases DLBCL, DLBCL - Tumor and ALL / AML were subjected to an analysis.

Time:
15:55 - 16:20

Title: Green synthesis of magnetic nanoparticle impregnated mesoporous Caco3 based multifunctional nanocarrier for controlled delivery of anticancer drug

Mohd Qasim
University of Hyderabad, India

Biography

Mohd Qasim obtained B.Sc. (Hons) in Chemistry, M.Sc. in Physical Chemistry and MTech in Nanotechnology from the Aligarh Muslim University, India. Currently, he is pursuing PhD in Nanoscience and Technology at the School of Engineering Sciences and Technology (SEST), University of Hyderabad, India under the supervision of Dr. Dibakar Das. His research interest mainly covers development of multifunctional nanomaterials and its applications. He published several research papers in refereed Journals and conference proceedings and has presented his research work in various national and international conferences.

Abstract

The use of biocompatible and biodegradable drug nanocarrier in biomedicine is becoming increasingly popular and getting significant priority over conventional synthetic nanocarriers. CaCO3 and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) based drug delivery nano-carriers are getting increasing attention because of their inherent biocompatibility and magnetic controllability, respectively. In this work, novel mesoporous CaCO3 based multifunctional magnetic nanocarrier (mmCaCO3 NC) have successfully been synthesized by environmental friendly biological route using waste egg shell, lemon juice, MNPs, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and their drug loading/release behavior and in vitro cyto-toxicity assay have been studied. A detailed mechanism of formation of mesoporous mmCaCO3 NC from bulk egg shell has been proposed. The structure and morphology of mmCaCO3 NC were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Particles size of MNPs and mmCaCO3 NC were found to be ~10 and ~150 nm, respectively. Powder XRD, TEM, SAED, FTIR and energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analyses confirmed coexistence of MNPs and CaCO3 phases in the nanocomposite. Magnetic properties of mmCaCO3 NC and MNPs were studied by vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) technique. Magnetic measurements (field (H) dependent magnetization (M)) show MNPs and mmCaCO3 NC to be super-paramagnetic in nature. Drug loading and release behavior of mmCaCO3 NC were studied using doxorubicin as the anticancer drug. Doxorubicin loading in mmCaCO3 NC was confirmed by FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques. A sustained and pH dependent drug release behavior was observed. Biocompatibility and cyto-toxicity of bare carriers and drug loaded carrier were studied by MTT assay. Obtained results suggest prepared nano formulation could have potential application in targeted drug delivery. The use of biocompatible and biodegradable mmCaCO3 NC, developed through a green chemistry route, in nanomedicine will be cheaper and environmental friendly.

Time:
16:20 - 16:45

Title: Effects of heat treatment temperature on the formation and stability of Na2Ca2Si3O9 crystalline phase: Advanced bioactive glass-ceramic for potential tissue engineering application

Md Enamul Hoque
King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia

Biography

Abstract

Recently, the SiO2-CaO-Na2O–P2O5 bioactive glass-ceramic system has shown high potential in tissue engineering applications due to its excellent biocompatibility, mechanical properties and remarkable bonding features with living tissues. This work focused on the synthesis of bioactive Na2Ca2Si3O9 crystalline phase along with amorphous phase by conventional solid-state reaction route. 50% SiO2, 23% CaO, 24% Na2O and 3% P2O5 powders were mixed and heat-treated under oxidizing environment at 800-1000°C for about 10 hours to attain the required structure. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were employed to investigate the effects of heat treatment temperature on the formation and stability of the Na2Ca2Si3O9 crystal phase. The resulting phase morphology was further examinedby the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The XRD, FTIR and FESEM studies confirmed the formation of glassy phase above 950°C. However, it wasobserved that phosphorous rich silicorhenanite phase (Na2Ca4(PO4)2SiO4) decreased with increasing heat treatment temperature which might have great effect on bioactivity. Keywords:Bioactive; Glass-ceramic; SiO2-CaO-Na2O–P2O5; Solid state reaction; Na2Ca2Si3O9 crystal

Keynote Speaker

Time:

Title: Functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes for gas sensing

Adnane Abdelghani
National Institute of Applied Science and Technology, Tunisia

Biography

Prof. Dr. A.Abdelghani is a Full Professor at the National Institute of Applied Science and Technology (INSAT, Tunisia).He obtained the Habilitation in Physics in Tunisia (faculty of Science of Tunis) in 2004 and a Habilitation (worlwide recognition for conducting and leading research) in "Sciences pour l�Ing�nieur" in 2009 at the Ecole Normale Superieur de Cachan (France). He is now the leader and principal investigator of a research group working mainly on gas sensors based on functionalized carbon nanotubes (metallic oxides, nanowires, nanoneedles, polymers) and on the development of interdigitated gold microelectrodes integrated in microfluidic cell for bacteria analysis in biologic medium. He published more than 90 papers in International Journals (H-index 25, December 2016) and supervised more than 12 Ph.D theses and 30 master�s student. He is deeply involved in industrial applications in his field of research with implications for the design and the development of affordable and cost-effective sensing devices for diagnostics and theranostics which will have an effective impact in the developing countries. He received the Tunisian President Award of the best scientific researcher in Tunisia in 22 July 2015.

Abstract

The monitoring of the environment requires devices that must be fast, sensitive, stable and selective to detect the pollutants and toxic gases/ vapors in a simple and efficient way. The chemical modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a long chain mercapto-acid is reported to improve the sensitivity and the response time of gas sensors for detecting alcohols, acetone and toxic gases such as DMMP and DMF. We developed sensors employing MWCNTs decorated with gold nanoparticles and modified with 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) monolayer. Morphological and compositional analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to characterize the gold nanoparticles and to check the bonding of the thiol monolayer. The detection of aromatic and non-aromatic volatiles and DMMP and DMF vapors by MWCNT/Au and MWCNT/Au/MHDA shows that the presence of the self-assembled layer increases sensitivity, selectivity and ameliorates response dynamics of the sensors.

Sessions:
Materials Science and Engineering

Time:

Session Chair:

Emad Mowafy
University of Hail, Saudi Arabia

Time:

Session Co-Chair:

Reda S. Abdel Hameed
University of Hail, Saudi Arabia

Time:
10:45 - 11:10

Title: Evaluation of novel ligand with highly extractability and selectivity for palladium

Emad Mowafy
University of Hail, Saudi Arabia

Biography

At present Prof. Emad Mowafy, working as a professor in chemistry department, faculty of Science, University of Hail, Saudi Arabia (2009-present). Before coming to Saudi Arabia, Dr. Mowafy had been working in leading research centers (Hot Labs. Center- EAEA) and many international advanced research projects. He earned all his degrees and titles in Atomic Energy Authority, Egypt: Doctor of inorganic and nuclear chemistry 1999, the title of professor in nuclear and radiation chemistry in 2009. He has more than 80 technical publication including reputed journal paper, international conference proceeding and book chapters. He has served as Ph.D examiner for some international universities as well as reviewer in several reputed international journals. He has successfully supervised over 15 (MS and Ph.D) students in chemistry. A major research focus is solvent extraction technology. In addition, Dr. Mowafy designed and developed many novel organic extractants and inorganic ion exchanger advanced materials for selective separation of economic and strategically elements from their aqueous waste solutions. Prof. Mowafy is a member of more than ten societies including American Chemical Society. He has served as organizing committee member of several international symposium and conferences related to the new trends in chemistry, material and separation technology. He received many medals and the state Prize in science (chemistry) 2008.

Abstract

Design and evolution of a new promising extractants for selective extraction and separation of palladium from aqueous solutions was done, which is an important subject not only from the point of monetary and high demand but also from waste treatment management. Recently, attentions have been removed to hydrometallurgical process for recovery of platinum group metals (PGMs) from secondary sources because most of the PGMs produce in the world is recovery by solvent extraction techniques. This represents one of the most important subject from economic and environment viewpoints. For this purpose, many ligands have been developmental and used during the last decades. Theses ligands have many limitations like slow kinetics of extraction, low solubility, poor decontamination factor, pH sensitivity and instability in acidic medium. The present study focusing on using of novel multidentate ligand namely; N,N,N',N'-tetra-octyl-dithiodiglycolamide (TODTDGA) as promising solvent extraction reagent to mainly perform the separation of Pd from other PGMs and from some commonly associated elements(Pt(IV), Rh(III), Fe(III), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II)) contained in concentrated hydrochloric acid or nitric acid media. Liquid–liquid batch extraction studies were investigated to understand the influence of various parameters on the extraction behavior of palladium. The extractant showed great extractability and selectivity for palladium than the other investigated metal ions, which showed negligible extraction values. The obtained results indicated that, the novel ligand could be a potential candidate for separation and recovery of palladium from spent catalyst dissolver (SSCD) solution.

Time:
11:25 - 11:50

Title: Pyrazolopyrimidinone derivatives as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel in acidic media

Reda S. Abdel Hameed
University of Hail, Saudi Arabia

Biography

Reda Abdel Hameed graduated with a degree in chemistry from Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt. He has carried out research projects in applied organic chemistry, physical chemistry, and green chemistry. He has more than 20 years of teaching experience as a lecturer and associate professor in Egypt and the KSA. Reda has more than 43 research papers in various national and international journals. He is currently working as an associate professor of applied Physical Chemistry at Al-Azhar University. The current address Faculty of Science, Hail University, KSA.

Abstract

Some Pyrazolop Pyrimidinone derivatives was synthesized, Purified, and evaluated as corrosion inhibitorby chemical and electrochemical methods at different inhibitor concentrations and temperatures. The inhibition efficiency for corrosion increased with increase in inhibitor concentration, but decreased with temperature. The obtained polarization curves indicate that these compounds act as mixed-type inhibitors. the adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic activation parameters were computed and discussed.

Time:
11:50 - 12:15

Title: Field-assisted and flash-sintering of yttria ceramics: Grain boundary nanostructure and mass transport phenomena

Hidehiro Yoshida
National Institute for Materials Science, Japan

Biography

Hidehiro Yoshida is a principal researcher in the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), and also serves as a visiting associate professor at Department of Materials Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science. He received his doctoral degree in material science in 2001 from The University of Tokyo; the doctoral thesis dealt with high temperature creep resistance of ceramics. His research addresses high temperature mass transport phenomena such as sintering, creep deformation, super plasticity, ionic conduction, and phase-transformation in structural/functional oxide ceramics. Special attention is placed on the relationship between the high temperature mass transport and grain boundary nanostructure. His research achievements cover a broad range of topics, from scholarly research to practical application of engineering ceramics. He has also contributed to the field of geoscience; superplastic flow and microstructural development in the earth’s mantle.

Abstract

Electric field-assisted sintering (FAST) is gaining interest in recent years due to the accelerated consolidation compared to conventional, pressure less sintering. In particular, flash-sintering, where densification occurs almost immediately (typically <5 seconds) under high DC electric field, has attracted extensive attention as an innovative sintering technique. The flash-sintering has been demonstrated in various ceramics, and nearly full density has been achieved at relatively low furnace temperature for very short time. Y2O3 has special chemical and physical properties such as high resistance to halogen-plasma corrosion and thermal stability, and is therefore known as a promising environment-resistant or optical material. However, Y2O3 is difficult to sinter. Dense, polycrystallineY2O3 ceramics have been developed by pressure less sintering in vacuum or hydrogen atmosphere at high temperature (typically >1600°C), by hot press sintering, and by hot isostatic pressing process. We have demonstrated that high-purity, undoped Y2O3 can be fully densified by pulsed electric current-assisted sintering; ECAS (or spark plasma sintering; SPS), where a green compact is directly heated by pulsed DC electric current under compressive stress, at a sintering temperature of around 1000°C. Translucent Y2O3 with a relative density of 99% was produced by ECAS at a sintering temperature of 1050°C under a compressive stress of 80MPa. In addition, transparent Y2O3 polycrystals have been obtained by ECAS technique with a combination of sintering temperature and compressive stress of 1050°C-300MPa or 1300°C-100MPa. More recently, almost instantaneous and full densification can be achieved in Y2O3 by flash-sintering, where densification occurs in a few seconds under a threshold condition of temperature and applied field. For instance, full densification is achieved at 1133°C under a field of 500 V/cm. The single-phase nature of ECASed and flash-sintered Y2O3bodies was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The FAST and flash-sintering techniques are very effective to produce dense Y2O3 ceramics at relatively low sintering temperatures and short sintering times. It is postulated that densification and grain growth were enhanced by accelerated solid-state diffusion, resulting from both Joule heating and the generation of defects under the applied field. The present paper aims to briefly summarize the recent results on the densification of Y2O3 through the electric current/field-assisted sintering, and to discuss the effect of electric field/current on the grain boundary nanostructure and mass transport in Y2O3.

Time:
12:15 - 12:40

Title: Nonreciprocal electric transport in chiral and polar nanomaterials

Toshiya Ideue
The University of Tokyo, japan

Biography

Toshiya Ideue received his bachelor’s degree in 2009 and master’s degree in 2011 from the University of Tokyo. He worked at Fujifilm Corporation for a year and a half. Then he returned to the University of Tokyo and obtained his Ph.D. in the field of quantum transport in materials without space inversion symmetry. He is now an assistant Prof. in the group of Prof. Y. Iwasa in the University of Tokyo and studying the exotic quantum transport in nanomaterials.

Abstract

Noncentrosymmetric nanomaterials are recently attracting a growing interest as a new platform for novel physical properties and functionalities. One of the manifestations of the lattice symmetry breaking in electric transport is the nonreciprocal magneto resistance, in which forward and backward current are not equivalent under magnetic field along the specific directions. In this presentation, I will talk about the recent experimental results on the nonreciprocal magneto transport measurements in chiral and polar nanomaterials. First, we report the exotic superconducting transport in multi-walled tungsten disulfide chiral nanotubes induced by ionic gating. The interference of supercurrent along the tube circumference was proved by the periodic magnetoresistance oscillation with the period of a flux quantum inside the tube. More importantly, the observation of second harmonic signal in AC resistance provides the clear evidence of nonreciprocal superconducting transport originating from the tube chirality. Second, we show the first observation of nonreciprocal electric transport in polar semiconductor BiTeBr, which hosts the atomically layered structure with tricolor stacking. Rectification effect satisfies the characteristic selection rule for polar systems and the magnitude of the signal is largely enhanced in low carrier samples, reflecting the giant spin-splitting. Moreover, the experimental results are well understood quantitatively on the basis of the simple Rashba model with the use of the Boltzmann equation, indicating that nonreciprocal transport measurement can be a new probe for estimating the Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Our results pave the new way for exploring the novel functionality in noncentrosymmetric nanomaterials.

Time:
12:40 - 13:05

Title: Synthesis and characterization of biopolymers used as bioactive food packages, obtained from organic wastes and starch

July Alexandra Rincón Chacón
Tecnoacademia Nodo Cazuca-CIDE, SENA, Colombia

Biography

July Alexandra Rincón is a Chemical Engineering Specialist in Project Management, four years of experience as Innovation Manager in Nanotechnology in “Tecnoacademia” a program from “SENA-Colombia”. In that program SENA aims to motivate high school students coming from vulnerable areas of the country, not only to learn complex engineering and science subjects as nanotechnology, but also the rigorousness and discipline of scientific and technological research. July Alexandra Rincón have training in quality management and innovation process, and also July Alexandra Rincón have experience with materials characterization techniques.

Abstract

Currently, finding new polymeric materials that could replace those conventionally used in manufacture of packaging obtained from petroleum derivatives, is a huge impact subject of research. In this work, biopolymers were synthetized using organic wastes, to obtain starch with disrupted molecular chains which confers it thermoplastic properties. The biopolymers showed broad range of mechanical properties as function of the proportions and type of organic wastes and commercial starch. Also, different natural products and wastes containing antiseptic substanceswhich have already been tried as natural fungal inhibitorsi.e garlic (Allium sativum) and watermelon seeds (Citrulluslanatus), where employed in the biopolymers fabrication process in order to develop anti-fungal activity food packaging systems. Strawberry was used as host fruit because of its occurrence an importance in Colombian fruits market.The morphology of polymeric productos was evaluated by SEM and AFM and texture, particle size strength and elasticity properties were correlated with mechanical properties obtained from a Universal Testing Machine., The project makes part of an educational program called “Tecnoacademia”, managed by “Servicio Nacional de Aprendizaje SENA-Colombia”, whose main objective is to train kids studying in Secondary Schools from vulnerable areas of Colombia. The management of organic wastes in the area of influence of “Tecnoacademia Nodo Cazucá” presents deficiencies in its correct disposal and management. As a consequence it is expected this work to positively impact the environment, economy and community of “Soacha and Cazucá”. Moreover, organic wastes with high content of starch and cellulose were obtained from formation and educational Technical and Technological programs of cooking (“Auxiliaren Cocina Técnicoen Cocina”).

Time:
14:10 - 14:35

Title: Design proposal for a microscope simulator speed electronics for the development of learning significant in nanotechnology

Camilo Andrés Paez Gallo
Tecnoacademia Nodo Cazuca-CIDE, SENA, Colombia

Biography

Abstract

Low-cost virtual tools of learning is a subject of pedagogic research of huge impact in knowledge transference of advanced engineering and science fields, i.e. nanotechnology. “Tecnoacademia” is a program of “ServicioNacional de Aprendizaje SENA-Colombia” whose main objective is to train kids studying in Secondary Schools from vulnerable areas of Colombia. In context, this study carried out in “TecnoacademiaNodoCazucá”, proposes the design of an educational simulator of a scanning electron microscopy equipment SEM (JEOL NeoScope JCM 5000) to be implemented in the seedbeds of “Video JuegosSerios” of the physics and nanotechnology educational environments. It is expected apprentices to be able to identify the main parts, tools, fundamentals and correct using of SEM as a characterization technique.

Time:
14:35 - 15:00

Title: Study of ultraviolet-visible light absorbance of exfoliated graphite forms

Abdullah Alhani
Al Baha University, Saudi Arabia

Biography

Abdullah Alhani Alghamdi done his Masters in MS, Physics Pittsburg State University in 2016 and B. A, Physics in Al Baha University, 2010. He is working as a Lecturer in Physics Dept., Faculty of Sciences, Al Baha University from 2011 to present.

Abstract

Despite the fact that there have been many studies of graphite exfoliation, none really addresses the issue of starting form of graphite. To address this issue various graphite forms (solid, powder and sooth) and graphite oxide (powder) are exfoliated in acetonitrile and studied via ultraviolet- visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. In different graphite forms two major absorbance peaks are observed at 223 nm and 273 nm corresponding to graphene oxide and graphene dispersions, respectively. The intensity change of the peaks refers to the layer number change. The intensity ratios of these peaks give information about the concentration of the exfoliation products. We observed that graphite oxide sample has the thinnest graphene dispersions among the compared samples, whereas graphite rod has the thickest. It appears that few layer graphene oxide dispersions exist more in graphite sooth and graphite oxide samples. Graphite oxide UV-Vis spectrum reveals two new absorbance peaks at 312 nm and 361 nm in addition to the graphene oxide and graphene dispersion peaks. To our knowledge these peaks were note observed before we think that these new peaks are formed due to conjugate polyenes that affect 𝜋→𝜋∗.

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